WATCH: Apparently we’ve been eating fake guacamole

I’m a new appreciator of avocado. Guacamole was my entry to the favoured fruit of the millennial and I have never looked back. 

I now have avocado with everything. Last night I actually had a slice of brown bread, bacon and half an avocado with some black pepper cracked  over it. 
Guacamole has become my favourite food and I try and have it with everything, because – why not? 

So imagine my shock when I found out that we may have been eating fake guacamole and that instead of avocado, some restaurants have been using squash. 

Food & Wine reports that some restaurants are using squash instead of avocado, thanks to the high price of the fruit. Apparently restaurants are using a squash and this makes the ‘guac’ thin and watery.
But because the fake guac tastes similar to the real thing, few have noticed.  

800x449?source=https%3A%2F%2Finm baobab prod eu west 1.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Finm%2Fiol%2Fmedia%2Fimage%2F2019%2F07%2F23%2F29706735%2Ffake and real guacamole - WATCH: Apparently we've been eating fake guacamole
Can you tell the difference? One is real and the other is faux. PICTURE: Javier Cabral
However in Mexico, it’s become a crisis and it has become increasingly common for Mexico City’s taquerias to serve fake guacamole in their tacos. 

Javier Cabral of La Taco wrote about how this has been happening for some time and how exactly it’s done.
"The fake guacamole recipe is nearly identical to your standard taqueria guacamole. Tomatillos, cilantro (coriander), garlic, jalapeño are still the core ingredients, instead, the imposter substitutes the green gold for the tender summer variety of Mexican squash usually sauteed in guisado form. The fake guacamole gets its creaminess thanks to the oil used to blister the jalapeño that emulsifies the rest of the ingredients," Cabral wrote.

There’s even a YouTube video and recipe by Patty Rodriguez that shows exactly how the fake guacamole is made. 

With avocado in season in South Africa, it’s best you do it yourself and steer clear of the store-bought condiment because you never know if it’s real or faux. 

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